Places to Explore — Metro West

Not sure where to start exploring? Try visiting one of our wildlife sanctuaries in the Metro West area.


Nature Center & Trails

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary

Waterfall in autumn at Broadmoor © Ethan Gordon
© Ethan Gordon

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary

Location: Natick
Trails: 9 miles

Easy-to-rugged, well-groomed trails weave through the shade of mature woodlands into open fields and along the edges of vibrant streams, ponds, marshland, and the Charles River. Details >

Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary

Drumlin Farm Wildlife Sanctuary

Location: Lincoln
Trails: 4 miles

A working farm and wildlife sanctuary with sheep, goats, chickens, cows, and pigs; sustainably-grown crops; trails; and resident owls, foxes, and a fisher. Details > 

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Habitat Education Center

Arboretum in July © Sandy Vorce, Mass Audubon
Arboretum in July © Sandy Vorce, Mass Audubon

Habitat Education Center

Location: Belmont
Trails: 2.5 miles

Just six miles from downtown Boston, find gentle trails that start at a Georgian-style mansion and wind through forests, across meadows, and around ponds and formal gardens. Details >

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Trails Only

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Waseeka Wildlife Sanctuary

Waseeka Wildlife Sanctuary

Location: Hopkinton
Trails: 1 mile

With its forest that opens up to a secluded pond, Waseeka offers the opportunity to observe woodland birds and waterbirds, wildflowers, and a fire-enhanced forest. Details >

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No Trails

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Brewster Woods Wildlife Sanctuary

Brewster Woods Wildlife Sanctuary

Location: Concord
Trails: N/A

Situated along the Concord River, this was formerly the country homestead of Mass Audubon's first president—ornithologist William Brewster. Not ready for visitors. Details >

Other Sanctuaries - Metro West


Not Ready for Visitors


Farrar Pond Wildlife Sanctuary, Lincoln

16 ACRES

Farrar Pond Wildlife Sanctuary is situated in a residential area, bordered to the north by Route 117 (South Great Road) and to the south by Farrar Pond. The property includes a private residence used for Mass Audubon staff housing, but a public walking trail through the wildlife sanctuary connects with trails in town and other nearby conservation lands.

Conservation Features: Most of the wildlife sanctuary consists of upland forest with a mixture of deciduous and coniferous trees. Although the habitat types present at Farrar Pond are not rare, the mixed forest is of relatively high quality, having few non-native species present and closely resembling oak-hemlock-white pine natural community type as described by the Massachusetts Natural Heritage and Endangered Species Program.