Mass Audubon, Partners Help Science Teachers Engage Students

Release Date:
May 27, 2015

LINCOLN, MA—Mass Audubon and the Museum Institute for Teaching Science (MITS) are partnering to bring STEM-focused summertime professional development to educators on Cape Cod, the North Shore, and in Boston’s western suburbs.

Developing facility in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering Mathematics) programs, Mass Audubon educators understand, is among the best ways that students learn to engage the natural world.

These one-week courses for grade 3–8 educators will bring together scientists, engineers, and educators from environmental organizations across the state. Activities will create interdisciplinary connections, develop inquiry-based methods, and help teachers meet state frameworks.

Subject matter to be studied has been designed with region ecosystems and habitats in mind:

“We are grateful to MITS and all our education partners who are helping to make these important and timely professional development opportunities available to teachers throughout Massachusetts,” said Kris Scopinich, Mass Audubon Director of Education. “Teachers and their students will benefit from these rich learning experiences and be more prepared to practice science in engaging and authentic ways.”

Find more information about Mass Audubon’s resources for educators.

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Mass Audubon is the largest nature-based conservation organization in New England. Founded in 1896 by two women who fought for the protection of birds, Mass Audubon carries on their legacy by focusing on the greatest challenges facing the environment today: the loss of biodiversity, inequitable access to nature, and climate change. With the help of our 140,000 members and supporters, we protect wildlife, conserve and restore resilient land, advocate for impactful environmental policies, offer nationally recognized education programs for adults and children, and provide endless opportunities to experience the outdoors at our wildlife sanctuaries. Explore, find inspiration, and take action at www.massaudubon.org.