Birding

Pileated woodpecker feeding chicks © Linda Cullivan
© Linda Cullivan

Support Bird Conservation

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Despite its small size, Massachusetts regularly records over 300 different species of birds every year. Mass Audubon's wildlife sanctuaries offer excellent opportunities to see and learn more about the birds of Massachusetts, whether you’re on a naturalist-guided walk or on your own with one of our bird checklists.

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Bird-a-thon

May 14–15, 2021

Bird-a-thon has been Mass Audubon's largest annual fundraiser since 1983. This year's event features fun nature activities for adults and children in addition to a competitive team birding contest.

Learn more >

Birding group from Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary

Whether you're a veteran or a novice, you'll find a wide variety of birding programs, classes, and outings suited to your experience level. Get birdy >

Eastern Towhee at Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary's bird feeder station © Mike Duffy
Eastern Towhee at Wellfleet Bay © Mike Duffy

Before you visit a sanctuary, download and print a bird checklist to bring with you so you can easily keep track of what you see. Check the list >

March 7-8 & 14-15, 2021

Baltimore Oriole & Indigo Bunting visiting home birdfeeders © Gail Hansche Godin
Baltimore Oriole & Indigo Bunting © Gail Hansche Godin

Our annual conference features nationally-renowned speakers and top-notch vendors. This year's event will be 100% virtual! Learn more >

May 14-15, 2021

Woman w binoculars birding in winter © Nick DeCondio
© Nick DeCondio

Mass Audubon's largest fundraiser features teams competing to raise money, do nature activities, and spot the most bird species in 24 hours. Learn more >

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Birds & Bird Conservation

Learn About Birds

All About Birds

Baltimore Oriole © Bill Sooter
Baltimore Oriole © Bill Sooter

Want to learn how to attract birds to your yard? Discover why birds behave in certain ways? How to ID species that look similar? We've got the answers and more! Get to know birds >

Snowy Owl Project

Saving Snowy Owls

Snowy Owl © Nathan Goshgarian
Snowy Owl © Nathan Goshgarian

Mass Audubon is working to protect Snowy Owls, the largest owls in North America. Learn how and follow each owl's progress on migration maps. Read more >  

Be a Community Scientist

Be a Community Scientist

Your reports from backyards, feeders, highways, and conservation areas across Massachusetts are important to Mass Audubon's efforts to learn more about the populations, distributions, and breeding activities of our birds. Join a project >