Oak Knoll Designated a “Service Enterprise” for Commitment to Volunteerism

Release Date:
August 8, 2018

ATTLEBORO—Mass Audubon’s Oak Knoll Wildlife Sanctuary has been certified as an official “Service Enterprise” for its growing number of volunteers who encourage people throughout Greater Attleboro to connect with nature.

Oak Knoll has attracted an enthusiastic volunteer corps to engage with visitors at the popular wildlife sanctuary and nature center located at 1417 Park Street, and also to help residents discover the natural world right in their own neighborhoods.

The Service Enterprise program is administered by Points of Light, the world’s largest organization dedicated to volunteer service and founded by former President George H. W. Bush 25 years ago.

In earning its “Service Enterprise” designation, Oak Knoll reflects Mass Audubon’s organization-wide commitment to volunteerism across its network of wildlife sanctuaries, from the Cape and Islands to the Berkshires. Last year, more than 14,000 individuals generously gave of their time in supporting the work of the state’s largest nature conservation nonprofit.

Points of Light President/CEO Natalye Paquin praised Oak Knoll in announcing the designation.

“Without organizations like yours—dedicated to engaging volunteers to drive change—so many local needs would go unmet,” Paquin said. “With dedication like yours, so many lives are improved and your community is stronger.”

Sanctuary Director Lauren Gordon said being designated a Service Enterprise presents a great opportunity for Oak Knoll to strengthen its community engagement. “And," Gordon noted, “it helps us strategically deploy volunteers to inspire our members and other visitors to appreciate and steward nature through meaningful, hands-on educational experiences.”

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Mass Audubon is the largest nature-based conservation organization in New England. Founded in 1896 by two women who fought for the protection of birds, Mass Audubon carries on their legacy by focusing on the greatest challenges facing the environment today: the loss of biodiversity, inequitable access to nature, and climate change. With the help of our 140,000 members and supporters, we protect wildlife, conserve and restore resilient land, advocate for impactful environmental policies, offer nationally recognized education programs for adults and children, and provide endless opportunities to experience the outdoors at our wildlife sanctuaries. Explore, find inspiration, and take action at www.massaudubon.org.