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Winged euonymus red leaves
Winged Euonymus © Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org

Winged Euonymus

About Winged Euonymus

Winged euonymus (Euonymus alatus) gets its name from the woody “wings” on many twigs. It’s a deciduous shrub that can grow up to 10 feet tall. It’s also known as burning bush because of its red fall foliage.

The Problem

It invades fields, field edges, and forests, and displaces native plants.  Birds eat the fruit and disperse the seeds of winged euonymus.  Second generation plants produced from these seed typically lack the bright red fall foliage of the parent plants.

The Solution

For small populations of seedlings and small plants, try hand pulling. In fields, frequent mowing can be effective. Large plants can be controlled by cutting, followed by the immediate application of a systemic herbicide to the cut stems or the application of a systemic herbicide as a foliar spray to stump sprouts in the following year. Always read and follow the directions on the label when using herbicide.

Pictures of Winged Euonymus

Winged euonymus red leaves
Winged Euonymus © Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Winged euonymus fruit and winged stem
Winged Euonymus fruit and winged stem
Winged euonymus winged stem and leaves
Winged Euonymus winged stem and leaves
Winged euonymus planted as a landscape shrub
Winged Euonymus planted as a landscape shrub
Winged euonymus fall color when planted as a landscape shrub
Winged Euonymus fall color