State of the Birds

Eastern Towhee
Pipilo erythrophthalmus

Although the Eastern Towhee remains nearly ubiquitous as a breeder in young forests and early successional habitats in Massachusetts, the BBS shows unequivocal signs of a serious decline in its population. While this decline appears to be slowing, continued and careful monitoring is critical for this species in the future.
Conservation Status
Conservation Action Urgent

Tracking This Bird In Massachusetts

Climate Vulnerability Score
Least Vulnerable
Mass Audubon Mean likelihood of occurrence (current)
0.52
Mass Audubon Mean likelihood of occurrence (2050)
0.51
Mass Audubon Absolute change in likelihood of occurrence
-0.01
U.S. Forest Service Climate Change Bird Atlas (Hadly Hi emissions scenario)a
-12.60
National Audubon Societyb
n/a
a USFS model data for Massachusetts by 2100
b National Audubon Society's Climate Change Atlas was completed on a continental scale.
Breeding Bird Atlas
Atlas I Blocks
871
Atlas II Blocks
913
Percent of state occupied - Atlas I
90
Percent of state occupied - Atlas II
88
Percent change
96
Breeding Bird Survey
Annual trend 1966-2010
-5.7%
P-value
significant, declining
Number of routes
26
Recent trend 2000-2010
-2%
Christmas Bird Count
Trend (1963-2008)
-2.9
Significantly different than zero
yes
Trend (1963-1979)
-4.5
Significantly different than zero
no
Trend (1979-2008)
0.2
Significantly different than zero
no
Christmas Bird Count Sightings By Year
Data reflects sightings per person per hour in order to account for varying numbers of yearly volunteers.

Habitat Usage

Breeding
Shrubland
Wintering
Shrubland

Additional Information