State of the Birds

Osprey
Pandion haliaetus

Thanks to extensive programs to construct nesting poles (especially in coastal areas) and the banning of DDT in 1972, the Osprey has once again become a common breeding bird in the Commonwealth. Its breeding distribution in the state remains somewhat restricted, with most birds found in coastal areas, but this is quickly changing, and inland nests are not uncommon.
Conservation Status
Monitor to Ensure Stability

Tracking This Bird In Massachusetts

Climate Vulnerability Score
Highly Vulnerable
Mass Audubon Mean likelihood of occurrence (current)
0.51
Mass Audubon Mean likelihood of occurrence (2050)
0.40
Mass Audubon Absolute change in likelihood of occurrence
-0.12
U.S. Forest Service Climate Change Bird Atlas (Hadly Hi emissions scenario)a
n/a
National Audubon Societyb
Climate Endangered
a USFS model data for Massachusetts by 2100
b National Audubon Society's Climate Change Atlas was completed on a continental scale.
Breeding Bird Atlas
Atlas I Blocks
24
Atlas II Blocks
277
Percent of state occupied - Atlas I
2
Percent of state occupied - Atlas II
27
Percent change
1100
Breeding Bird Survey
Annual trend 1966-2010
14.7%
P-value
not significant
Number of routes
8
Recent trend 2000-2010
14.3%
Christmas Bird Count
Trend (1963-2008)
6.3
Significantly different than zero
yes
Trend (1963-1979)
0
Significantly different than zero
Trend (1979-2008)
5.7
Significantly different than zero
no
Christmas Bird Count Sightings By Year
Data reflects sightings per person per hour in order to account for varying numbers of yearly volunteers.

Habitat Usage

Breeding
Coastal, Forested Wetland, Open Freshwater Marsh, Rivers, Lakes, and Ponds, Saltmarsh
Wintering
Coastal, Rivers, Lakes, and Ponds

Additional Information

Climate Suitability Current and 2050