Impact of Ecological Management

Meadows and view of Mt Tom at Arcadia

Mass Audubon manages more than 38,000 acres of wildlife habitat across the state, ranging from barrier beaches to open fields to northern hardwood forests. We regularly inventory and monitor our land and implement management actions to ensure that our wildlife sanctuaries truly are protecting the nature of Massachusetts.

Key Accomplishments from FY 2018



13 

New England Cottontail rabbit by Nick Tepper (staff)
New England Cottontail

Acres of shrubland created at Richardson Brook Wildlife Sanctuary for New England Cottontail and other wildlife. 

 

 16 

Fields after 2018 restoration work at Moose Hill
Restored fields at Moose Hill

Acres of degraded old fields restored at Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary by removing exotic invasive plants. 

 5 

Eastern Bluebird male perched on twig © Joel Eckerson
Eastern Bluebird © Joel Eckerson

Acres of non-native trees cleared at Ipswich River Wildlife Sanctuary to expand the amount of shrubland and remove diseased non-native trees. This improved habitat will benefit birds like American Kestrel, American Woodcock, Eastern Bluebirds, and Tree Swallows.

 

110 

Monarchs in goldenrod field © Suzette Johnson
Monarchs © Suzette Johnson

Pounds of native seed mix received from the state pollinator partnership. In total, 40 lbs will be planted at Moose Hill, 60 lbs will be planted at North River, and 10 lbs will be planted at Attleboro Springs.

5,059 

Releasing parasitoid wasp larvae at Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary

Number of parasitoid wasp larvae released at Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary as part of a trial biocontrol program for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), an invasive beetle that kills ash trees. EAB was found on the property in 2017 and has the potential to degrade forested floodplain communities throughout the Connecticut River Valley and beyond. This biocontrol program and associated ecological research is being implemented by project partners at the Massachusetts DCR, The Nature Conservancy, and UMass Amherst.

 

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