Mass Audubon Making “Winter Recess” Extra Special Feb. 13–28 with More Get-Outside Programs and Free Admission to Select Sanctuaries During School Vacation Week

Release Date:
February 12, 2021
Winter Recess Logo with mitten graphic

LINCOLN, MA—Who doesn’t love recess? Make the most of Mass Audubon’s “Winter Recess,” which is offering  programs and activities beginning Saturday, February 13 and running through the end of the month that invite children and families to enjoy the outdoors in winter.

There’s a full range of fun and engaging opportunities to check out, from Vacation Week options at Mass Audubon’s statewide network of wildlife sanctuaries to at-home and online programs and “Nature Play Days,” all of which encourage families to connect with the natural world during the colder months.

And thanks to support from Highland Street Foundation and the New England Patriots Charitable Foundation, Mass Audubon will be offering free admission at five of its wildlife sanctuaries in eastern Massachusetts, one each day during school vacation week.

From Monday, February 15 through Friday, February 19, the public is invited to visit a different wildlife sanctuary each day, free of charge. You must reserve online in advance for free admission.

Participating wildlife sanctuaries include:

  • Drumlin Farm in Lincoln; Monday, February 15
  • Broadmoor in Natick; Tuesday, February 16
  • Blue Hills Trailside Museum in Milton; Wednesday, February 17
  • Museum of American Bird Art in Canton (gallery and trails); Thursday, February 18
  • Ipswich River in Topsfield; Friday, February 19

Winter can be a season of discovery and awe for young people, and “Winter Recess” is a terrific way to make those introductions in a safe and fun manner. To register and learn more, please visit massaudubon.org/winterrecess.

Highland Street Foundation logo
New England Patriots Charitable Foundation
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Mass Audubon is the largest nature-based conservation organization in New England. Founded in 1896 by two women who fought for the protection of birds, Mass Audubon carries on their legacy by focusing on the greatest challenges facing the environment today: the loss of biodiversity, inequitable access to nature, and climate change. With the help of our 140,000 members and supporters, we protect wildlife, conserve and restore resilient land, advocate for impactful environmental policies, offer nationally recognized education programs for adults and children, and provide endless opportunities to experience the outdoors at our wildlife sanctuaries. Explore, find inspiration, and take action at www.massaudubon.org.