Eastern Massachusetts Bird Sightings

Increasing numbers of sea ducks, Northern Gannets, Double-crested Cormorants, and various other seabird species are migrating in good numbers along the coast right now, especially when there are accompanying onshore winds from the north or north-east.  Most abundant of these species in the next few weeks are likely to be Surf, White-winged, and Black scoters, Common Eiders, Red-breasted Mergansers, and Common Loons.  In addition to migrating sea ducks and seabirds, good numbers of Blue Jays and increasing numbers of Purple Finches, and Pine Siskins are starting to be reported. Read More

Hawk migration is still in progress, with Ospreys, Sharp-shinned Hawks, Merlins, and Peregrine Falcons now among the more common species still moving, along with the vanguard of the Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawk migration. Wachusett Mountain in Princeton and barrier islands along the coast tends to be the best vantage points for observing hawk migration at this time of year.  In addition to hawk migration, the weeks ahead also promise to host large numbers of migrating sea ducks along the coast.  Most abundant of these species in the next few weeks are likely to be Surf, White-winged, and Black scoters, Common Eiders, and Red-breasted Mergansers. Read More

Hawks are still moving in good numbers, although the largest Broad-winged Hawk flights have now past.   Wachusett Mountain in Princeton continues to be one of the best vantage points for observing hawk migration.  This a good time to see decent numbers of Sharp-shinned Hawks, as well as the vanguard of Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawk migration.  Any day with cool conditions the night before and accompanying north or northwest winds the following day is likely to produce a significant movement of hawks right now.  Be particularly watchful from hill or mountaintops with a clear view of the northern horizon. Read More