Eastern Massachusetts Bird Sightings

Mass Audubon’s annual spring Bird-a-thon last weekend produced lots of reports of many species of spring migrants from a variety of locations.  The variety was highlighted by a spectacular assortment of warblers that included no fewer than 30 species among which were Worm-eating, Golden-winged, Blue-winged, Lawrence’s, Tennessee, Orange-crowned, Mourning, Hooded, Cape May, Bay-breasted, Canada, Wilson’s, and Yellow-breasted Chat. Among the other migrants arriving in increasing numbers this week were good numbers of shorebirds at key coastal locations, Yellow-billed and Black-billed cuckoo, Common Nighthawk, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Yellow-bellied, Alder, and Willow flycatcher, Philadelphia Vireo, Cliff Swallow, and White-crowned Sparrow. Read More

As spring migration for many species reaches its peak in the next week or so, the variety of bird species being reported is equally spectacular. The variety of warblers heads the list, with no fewer than 30 species reported including such favorites as Worm-eating, Golden-winged, Lawrence’s, Orange-crowned, Hooded, Cape May, Bay-breasted, Canada, and Yellow-breasted Chat. Other migrants arriving this week included Yellow-billed and Black-billed cuckoo, Common Nighthawk, and Whip-poor-will. Read More

The warm temperatures and southwest winds in mid-week generated the first major migrant waves of the spring, with large numbers of warblers and many other migrants being reported from a number of localities.  Among the various migrants at least 30 species of warblers were reported including Worm-eating, Prothonotary, Orange-crowned, Mourning, Hooded, Cape May, Bay-breasted, Yellow-throated, and Canada warblers.  With decent weather expected for the next few days there should be lots of new migrants to be found practically everywhere this weekend. Read More

Now that May has arrived birders should increasingly be on the lookout for a plethora of new migrants, especially once the winds turn to the south and the temperature increases.  Among some of the new arrivals this week were good numbers of Glossy Ibises, Virginia Rails, Least Sandpipers, Chimney Swifts, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Eastern Kingbirds, Blue-headed Vireos, Barn Swallows, Gray Catbirds, Ovenbirds, both Louisiana and Northern waterthrushes, Black-and-white Warblers, Black-throated Green Warblers, Vesper Sparrows, and both Orchard and Baltimore orioles. Read More