Eastern Massachusetts Bird Sightings

Once again the avian excitement this week revolved around seabirds and shorebirds. This is near the peak of shorebird migration after all.

A sea watcher at Andrew’s Point in Rockport on Wednesday counted 120 Cory’s, 760 Great, 9 Sooty, and 40 Manx shearwaters; 11 Wilson’s Storm-Petrels; 910 Northern Gannets; 9 Red-necked Phalaropes; one Long-tailed Jaeger; an Atlantic Puffin; a Little Gull; and 16 Laughing Gulls. Last Sunday, in 90 minutes of seawatching from Race Point Beach (Provincetown) there were 1200 Cory’s Shearwaters, 38 Great Shearwaters, 35 Sooty Shearwaters, 20 Manx Shearwaters, 9 Northern Gannets, 1 Pomarine Jaeger, and 3 Parasitic Jaegers. Read More

Seabirds and shorebirds continue to dominate the birding scene right now.  Good numbers of shearwaters, storm-petrels, and lesser numbers of jaegers are concentrating primarily on the southern portions of the Stellwagen Bank Marine Sanctuary, and shorebirds in good numbers are appearing at favored coastal at a number of locations such as Newburyport Harbor and Plum Island, Duxbury and Plymouth Beach, and many of the outer beaches on Cape Cod.  Practically all species of shorebirds can be expected in the next couple weeks, but those that are particularly abundant or conspicuous right now are Black-bellied and Semipalmated plover, American Oystercatcher, Greater and Lesser yellowlegs, Willet, Whimbrel, Hudsonian Godwit, Ruddy Turnstone, Red Knot, Sanderling, Semipalmated Sandpiper, White-rumped Sandpiper, Stilt Sandpiper, and Short-billed Dowitcher.  Migrating warblers such as Northern Waterthrush, Blue-winged Warbler, American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, and Prairie Warbler are also appearing with increasing regularity, especially in thickets along the coast. Read More

At this season shorebirds dominate the birding scene, especially at some of the more favored locations such as Newburyport Harbor and Plum Island, Duxbury and Plymouth Beach, and many of the outer beaches on Cape Cod.  Species that are particularly abundant or conspicuous right now are Semipalmated Plover, American Oystercatcher, Greater and Lesser yellowlegs, Willet, Whimbrel, Ruddy Turnstone, Sanderling, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Stilt Sandpiper, and Short-billed Dowitcher.  Birders should also be on the lookout for early migrating warblers such as Northern Waterthrush, Blue-winged Warbler, American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, and Prairie Warbler especially in thickets along the coast. Read More

Once again interesting pelagic species and increasing numbers of migrating shorebirds dominated the birding scene this week.  Some of the shorebird species that will likely be nearing their peak numbers for the year in the next few days are Lesser Yellowlegs, Whimbrel, Least Sandpiper, Stilt Sandpiper, and Short-billed Dowitcher.  Also, early migrating warblers such as Northern Waterthrush and Yellow Warbler are already beginning to appear in thickets at favored coastal locations. Read More