Eastern Massachusetts Bird Sightings

Mid-fall migration is now in full swing, with large numbers of sea ducks and other waterfowl appearing in increasing numbers near the coast and on inland ponds and lakes, Northern Gannets and Double-crested Cormorants conspicuously migrating southward during the day, and Yellow-rumped Warblers and a variety of sparrow species haunting brushy areas and weedy fields practically everywhere where these habitats exist.  The protracted Nor’easter late in the week also generated major movements of several seabird species at outlying coastal observation points and on Cape Cod. Read More

Pine Siskins and Purple Finches continue to be reported moving through the state. On Saturday, an observer counted 21 Purple Finches and 288 Pine Siskins migrating over Peabody in and Hour and a half. Read More

Increasing numbers of sea ducks, Northern Gannets, Double-crested Cormorants, and various other seabird species are migrating in good numbers along the coast right now, especially when there are accompanying onshore winds from the north or north-east.  Most abundant of these species in the next few weeks are likely to be Surf, White-winged, and Black scoters, Common Eiders, Red-breasted Mergansers, and Common Loons.  In addition to migrating sea ducks and seabirds, good numbers of Blue Jays and increasing numbers of Purple Finches, and Pine Siskins are starting to be reported. Read More

Hawk migration is still in progress, with Ospreys, Sharp-shinned Hawks, Merlins, and Peregrine Falcons now among the more common species still moving, along with the vanguard of the Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawk migration. Wachusett Mountain in Princeton and barrier islands along the coast tends to be the best vantage points for observing hawk migration at this time of year.  In addition to hawk migration, the weeks ahead also promise to host large numbers of migrating sea ducks along the coast.  Most abundant of these species in the next few weeks are likely to be Surf, White-winged, and Black scoters, Common Eiders, and Red-breasted Mergansers. Read More